06 March 2019

Different api versions to use in your manifest file

according to kubernetes : The API server exposes an HTTP API that lets end users, different parts of your cluster, and external components communicate with one another. The Kubernetes API lets you query and manipulate the state of objects in the Kubernetes API (for example: Pods, Namespaces, ConfigMaps, and Events)


                                  APIs are gateway to your kubernetes cluster

KindapiVersion
CertificateSigningRequestcertificates.k8s.io/v1beta1
ClusterRoleBindingrbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
ClusterRolerbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
ComponentStatusv1
ConfigMapv1
ControllerRevisionapps/v1
CronJobbatch/v1beta1
DaemonSetextensions/v1beta1
Deploymentextensions/v1beta1
Endpointsv1
Eventv1
HorizontalPodAutoscalerautoscaling/v1
Ingressextensions/v1beta1
Jobbatch/v1
LimitRangev1
Namespacev1
NetworkPolicyextensions/v1beta1
Nodev1
PersistentVolumeClaimv1
PersistentVolumev1
PodDisruptionBudgetpolicy/v1beta1
Podv1
PodSecurityPolicyextensions/v1beta1
PodTemplatev1
ReplicaSetextensions/v1beta1
ReplicationControllerv1
ResourceQuotav1
RoleBindingrbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
Rolerbac.authorization.k8s.io/v1
Secretv1
ServiceAccountv1
Servicev1
StatefulSetapps/v1



alpha
API versions with ‘alpha’ in their name are early candidates for new functionality coming into Kubernetes. These may contain bugs and are not guaranteed to work in the future.

beta
‘beta’ in the API version name means that testing has progressed past alpha level, and that the feature will eventually be included in Kubernetes. Although the way it works might change, and the way objects are defined may change completely, the feature itself is highly likely to make it into Kubernetes in some form.

stable
Those do not contain ‘alpha’ or ‘beta’ in their name. They are safe to use.

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